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The Best Shoes for People with Diabetes

Content provided by: Better Medicine from Healthgrades

Cowboy boots, pumps, wingtips, or sneakers? If you have diabetes, choosing shoes is far more than a matter of looks—it’s a vital part of your treatment plan. Finish off an outfit with well-fitting, comfortable shoes or boots and you can prevent sores, nerve damage, and even amputation.

It may take some time and patience, and perhaps the advice of your podiatrist or an experienced footwear professional, but you can find footwear that’s both flattering and healthy for your feet. Look for shoes that:

  • Breathe. Air circulation can keep your feet safe from fungus or bacteria. Choose shoes made of porous materials, such as leather or fabric. Skip those made with stifling plastic. However, don’t aim for too much of a good thing. Sandals and flip-flops may give your feet more oxygen, but they also increase your risk of injury. Avoid them.

  • Absorb shock. Special shock-absorbing soles, often found in athletic shoes, can reduce the impact your feet take with each step. If your shoes don’t come with this feature, you may be able to purchase special insoles that serve the same purpose.

  • Don’t pinch or crowd. High heels and pointed toes may be in vogue, but they’re likely to cause long-term damage. Search for low-heeled styles that don’t rub or pinch your feet or cause calluses or blisters. Over time, these seemingly minor annoyances can turn into big problems, including ulcers and infections.

  • Fit well. Shoes that are too big may cause your foot to shift inside without you noticing, squashing your toes, or increasing the pressure on them. But don’t be tempted to buy shoes that are too small, which can hinder your circulation.


Related Video: Top 5 Rules to Live By with Diabetes

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© 2013 Healthgrades, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

Indications and Usage for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Prescription Lantus® is a long-acting insulin used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes and adults and children (6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It should be taken once a day at the same time each day to lower blood glucose.

Do not use Lantus® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis.

Important Safety Information for Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection)

Do not take Lantus® if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®.

You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.

Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others.

The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include injection site reactions, including changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, including itching and rash. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life threatening.

Tell your doctor about other medicines and supplements you are taking because they can change the way insulin works. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including if you have liver or kidney problems, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed.

Lantus® SoloSTAR® is a disposable prefilled insulin pen. Please talk to your healthcare provider about proper injection technique and follow instructions in the Instruction Leaflet that accompanies the pen.

Please click here or the link below for the full prescribing information for Lantus®

US.GLA.13.12.055 © 2014 sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC, A SANOFI COMPANY


How do you get it just right? It’s best not to rely on how a shoe feels—especially if you know you have nerve damage. Have your feet measured regularly when you go to purchase new footwear. Then, choose a style and size that leaves 10 to 15 millimeters between your toes and the front of the shoe. Try to match the shape of the shoe’s toe-box to the shape of your toes. And check that the widest part of your foot—across the base of your toes—aligns with the widest part of your shoe.

Since your feet may swell and shrink during the course of a day or month, seek out shoes with an adjustable fit. Laces, Velcro, and buckles all allow you to make changes to accommodate your comfort.

Follow the doctor’s orders

If you have concerns about finding the right shoe, or if you’ve already had foot sores, your doctor may suggest prescription footwear specially designed for your feet. They’re often covered by insurance, and some styles can reduce the pressure on your feet by as much as 30 percent, according to a recent study in the journal Diabetes Care.

Brands approved by the American Podiatric Medical Association for people with diabetes include CrocsRx and Dr. Comfort.

Key takeaways

  • Wearing well-fitting, comfortable shoes can help prevent sores, nerve damage, and even amputation.

  • Choose shoes made of porous materials, such as leather or fabric, but avoid sandals and flip-flops.

  • Search for low-heeled styles that don’t rub or pinch your feet or cause calluses or blisters.

  • Have your feet measured. Then, choose a style and size that leaves 10 to 15 millimeters between your toes and the front of the shoe.

Medical Reviewer: Williams, Robert, MD Last Annual Review Date: 2013-02-05 Copyright: 2013 Healthgrades, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement.

Reference: Diabetes section on Better Medicine


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